CV or not CV.. that is the question

CV-funny

If you’re originally from the states like I am, then you will know that the CV is known as the  résumé in this instance. Let’s face it.. the title would have been difficult to create… what really rhyme’s with  résumé  anyway?

ré·su·mé

or re·su·me or re·su·mé  (rĕz′o͝o-mā′, rĕz′o͝o-mā′)

n.

1. A brief account of one’s professional or work experience and qualifications, often submitted with an employment application.
2. A summary: a résumé of the facts of the case.

Okay, now down to the nitty-gritty….

“This above all: to thine own self be true” what a wonderful quote(Thanks Will!) This is what you should be portraying in your CV.  A CV as you may or may not know, should be a “snapshot” of who you are today with a frame suited to what you are currently seeking. (e.g. goals, roles etc) Apologies, but for some reason I cannot stop rhyming!

If you’re like me and have perfected a CV,  you know that it takes a lot of time, effort and thought.  (almost as much as the actual interview preparation takes) Yet, for some reason, many employers and companies  ask that you complete an application to make it easier for them to read or score.  I do understand the reason behind this but disagree that the CV should completely be eliminated. It’s almost like asking someone to cover their phone calls at work… even though they use and answer the phone, they don’t specifically answer someone else’s. They have the knowledge and confidence with their calls or in this case, their CV, which is a personal and professional presentation.

There is also very little CV preparation and guidance support from educational institutions, which needs to change. I’ve received numerous CV’s from applicants during my career from under 30’s that were so poor, I was almost tempted to fix them all to give them a chance at securing an interview.  We live in a competitive world these days and how you present yourself on paper is quite important. Although…. I’d be curious to conduct a test without the need for a CV and invite someone in who calls and asks for an interview because they want a job doing what we’re advertising.  Hmmmmm

LinkedIn is also a good way of showcasing your professional background and if an applicant has recommendations included, “wallah” instant reference’s! Genius! How many employer’s today use LinkedIn to recruit?  Perhaps a lot more than a couple of years ago.

So I ask you the question again…. CV or not CV?

By the way, I have included a pretty good CV-template-2015, for those that need one.  Just doing my bit to help.

As always, I welcome comments and suggestions.

Hands-on

“Who’s the optimist?”

optimist

I must admit, I was tempted to use the title “Who’s the Daddy”, but I held back.

It didn’t quite fit and I wanted to communicate a unisex attitude.  Let me make a list of optimistic traits and please feel free to feedback and add a few of your own.

Hands-on’s 10 traits of an optimist

  1. Cup half full (I’m sure you already know this one)
  2. Focuses on what they have, rather than what they don’t have
  3. Positive thinking, even during the most challenging of times
  4. “Good ideas” person and sticks to their beliefs in a constructive way
  5. Trustworthy,honest and genuine
  6. Tell’s it how it is, in a gentle and supportive manner
  7. Take’s on a challenge with a smile and determination
  8. Listens first, responds second
  9. Lends a hand  without being asked
  10. Builds someone else’s self-esteem when they are down

I’m sure the list is much longer but I’m conscious of the amount of time my reader’s have to review blogs that they subscribe to.

How about a tune you say?  Sure!

Here’s a classic that will set the mood!

Stay happy!

Hands-on 🙂

People who need people

happy employees

Curious title… yes!

I’ve always been drawn to people, both in life and as part of my career.  They interest me, intrigue me and yes, sometimes disappoint me. As  an optimist, I am not here to focus on the negative, but I do want to raise the awareness of the “good stuff” for those who would benefit from a little self-awareness and improvement. I’m the observer and the people watcher, which  has served me well over the years.

Let’s talk about the “good stuff”, respect and admiration for just a moment. Over the course of my career, I have encountered many types of people:

  • genuine
  • curious
  • helpers
  • Loyal
  • competitive
  • Driven

For me, I prefer working  with the first 4 types. Don’t get me wrong…being competitive and driven can be great but there is a time and a place for it and you need not forget about the people you work with.  Cut-throat is not my style and it drains my “good energy”.

I recently saw a post on LinkedIn, quoting the type of work practice and ethos I’m into, so I shared it.

T.E.A.M

  • together
  • everyone
  • achieves
  • more

It’s that simple and so true. Let’s use Sir Richard Branson ( inspirational  leader) as the example… he’s an extremely successful and powerful entrepreneur who develops ideas into businesses that for the most part, have excelled. Did he do this alone? No. He sought advice, created his support team and ensured that everyone worked together for one common goal>SUCCESS.  He motivates and rewards his teams too, which is why and how he has done so well.  So the next time you hear a story or read a story about dear Richard, know that he picked and lead his teams well to get where he is today.

When you consider how much time we spend at work each day and week… our rituals and experiences need to be positive don’t they?  Yes there are targets and yes there are objectives but for me, a business cannot and will not succeed if their people do not support one another. Would you like another  benefit of working together? Okay… what about learning from one another? Each person that you encounter in  your  workplace  has a different style, level of knowledge and expertise in a company or if they’ve been doing it a while, their sector. It’s not a competition, it’s a learning experience. I myself have learned from people 10 years my junior and 20 years my senior.  Make someone feel good and ask how they would go about doing a task you’re about to do.  You will probably learn something great, but you will also make your co-worker feel needed and trusted.  Everyone started somewhere, everyone needs help and guidance no matter the level and people do genuinely need people.

Streisand
Thanks for reading! Hands on 🙂